Step 11b – Lookouts and Fascia

Two other items that need to be installed before adding the sheathing are the lookouts, fascia, and subfascia.  These elements will work together to add some flair to the edge of the roof line.  The lookouts run along the gable ends of the house, and will not only give a nice look to the trim, but will also support the outer edge of the roof, which will run a couple feet beyond the walls of the house.  These overhangs help to keep rain away from the walls, and also provide some shade for the windows when the sun is high in the sky.  

The lookouts consist of 2×6 lumber cut just under 4 feet long, and are installed like cantilevers.  One end is nailed one truss inside from the gable end truss.  The gable end truss is then notched so the 2×6 sits inside of it.  The other end is left loose as you can see above, and will eventually attach to the bargeboard.  This step is easier once the roof sheathing is on.

You should be able to visualize how the cantilever works in the picture above as all of the weight placed on the outer edge of the lookout will actually create an uplifting force on the inside truss.   This force will be nicely balanced by the weight of the roof.  You can also see why the lookouts need to be installed before the roof sheathing, as half of them will be covered up with the sheathing.

The subfascia attaches to the end of the truss tails.  Not only will I be using it to line up the ends of the trusses and ensure they are nice and straight, I will also use it as a support for the fascia, which I will describe next, and to provide nailing for the soffit, which won’t be added until a few more months in the build have passed.  Like the frieze blocks, the top of the subfascia is beveled to match the slope of the roof.

Straightening the trusses out sometimes requires a significant amount of force, Imagine yourself 20 feet up in the air, leaning out over the edge of the wall, trying to hold an 8 pound nailgun with one hand and applying a ton of force with the other hand… Not a pretty thought, is it?  Clamps give me an extra pair of hands so I don’t need to put myself in those kinds of positions.  Above you can see how I used two of them – one to move the truss slightly horizontally and another to move it vertically.

A couple makeshift brackets help support the subfascia while I’m getting it ready to nail in.  The main part of it was a 20 foot long 2×6 board, which weighs in at close to 50lbs.  It isn’t something you really want to carry up a 20 foot ladder!  With the brackets, I was able to pull the board up through the trusses and then ease it over the edge of the truss tails until it was lying on the brackets.  Then I would climb up the ladder to nail it in.  Once I was finished I pulled out the nails holding the bracket to the wall and set it to the side until the next time I need it.

 

The final step before attaching the sheathing is the fascia.  The fascia is pre-primed and textured since it is one of the first pieces we are adding to the house that will still be visible when construction is completed.  As you can see, it attaches directly to the subfascia.

Just like the previous parts I described, the top of the fascia is beveled to match the slope of the roof.  The edge of the roof sheathing will sit on top of the fascia.  When the gutters are added, they will run around the fascia and partially conceal it.

 

Step 8 – Frame the First Floor

After spending the weekend spraying the new slab down every hour or so, it was finally time to get the walls up!  This process of “wet curing” concrete can add up to 50 percent more strength when done for 3-7 days because it prevents the water inside the concrete from evaporating.  While many contractors immediately begin framing the house the day after the concrete is poured with no problems, I played it safe and waited until the 3rd day to get going.

The first step was to “snap lines” (see pic above) where the walls would go.  This will help me to ensure the bottoms of the walls stay straight and square to each other.  I took several measurements of the footings, including the diagonal measurements from corner to corner, to decide where to start.  The footings came out really good, but not perfect (this is my first solo build, after all!)  There will be a few small areas of concrete that stick out a bit or don’t come out far enough.  This is no problem at all structurally and visually it will be covered up by the siding, but in taking these measurements I was able to position the walls to minimize it as much as possible.

Here you can see where the concrete sticks out a half inch

The exterior walls will be framed on 2×6’s, so the first lines I snapped mark where the inside edge of the bottom plates will go, 5.5 inches in from my starting corner (for those not in the know, a 2×6 is actually only 5.5 inches wide on average)  Snapping lines is done using a chalk reel, which is basically a spool of string inside of a metal casing.  The casing has a sliding door so that you can fill it with chalk, that way when you pull out the string it gets covered in it.  I would put the end of the string on my mark on one end of the footing and weight it down with my sledge hammer, then allow the chalked string to unroll as I walked to the other side.  By pulling the string taut against the concrete and then lifting it just an inch, the line snapped back down leaving a neat line of chalk behind.

Once I had marked all the exterior walls, I grabbed the first sill plate from my pile of lumber and cut it down to 20′ (most lumber yards give you an extra 1/2 inch or so).  I lined it up on my line and marked out the anchor bolt locations, and then drilled them out.  (Remember that the bolts were embedded in the concrete footings so just the top part is sticking out)  Then I placed it over the bolts and made sure it lined up just right.  I repeated the procedure all the way around each wall until I had all 4 done.  With the placement of the exterior walls now set, I was able to measure out the locations of the interior walls and snap those lines as well.  It will be much easier to mark them now and serve as a sort of map to where my interior walls will be going.

I had to call a friend over to help me carry the 32′ long LVL top plate from the lumber pile over to the slab, and we set it on edge next to the bottom plate, which I had also turned on edge.  I used some clamps to hold them together perfectly lined up, and then used a tape measure to mark out the stud locations every 2 feet.  I had ordered the studs precut so that saved me a lot of time.  I just had to carry them over from the lumber pile and then inspect them and “crown” them.  Lumber being a product of nature is never perfect.  Sometimes they have significant bends or waves in them and I will save those for later.  The straighter ones I will use now, but even the straighter ones have a bit of a curve or “crown” in them.  I lined the crowns up all going the same direction which will make it easier to straighten them out later in the build.

 

 

 

Once all the studs were laid out on my marks it was just a matter of nailing them together.  Building codes offer several different ways to satisfy nailing requirements, and the one I chose will be 3 16D nails to connect each stud to the top and bottom plates.  I took my time and carefully aligned each stud to ensure that it didn’t stick out on either side of the top plate.  It is situations like these where even with my lack of experience I can guarantee I put together a better wall than 90% of the framing crews since they are focused on speed over quality.

For the window openings, a larger piece of lumber must be used to carry the load from the opening that is missing a stud to the studs on either side of it.  Again, building codes dictate several ways to satisfy these header requirements, and for mine I chose a single 2×10.  I will also be utilizing some metal hangers to carry the weight of the header instead of shorter studs called jack studs, although you can see that I did use jack studs for the entry door in the pic below.

The jack studs are the ones that are shorter than the regular studs on either side of the door opening

Once all the lumber was nailed together, I unrolled some “sill gasket” and placed it over the footing where the wall will be hoisted.  I also nailed some long 2×4’s to the top of the wall.  As we raise the wall, these boards will swing out and brace it.  The wall was very heavy but with a few friends we were able to get it airborne with ease.  Once it was vertical, I staked down the bracing boards and then screwed the nuts down over large square washers on the anchor bolts.

If you look closely you can see the white sill gasket underneath the bottom plate

Within a couple days I was able to finish the remaining 3 walls and raise them into place as well.  It’s so much fun to see my vision becoming reality!

The long 2x4s in front forming an ‘x’ are the bracing pieces I was talking about